DesktopOK

by Barry Dysert
(last updated April 17, 2017)

2

DesktopOK is a nice little utility if you sometimes work with different screen resolutions (or otherwise have your desktop icons moved around on you). I oftentimes remote into a work system from my laptop, and when I get back on the real work machine my desktop icons are scrambled. DesktopOK is there for me.

What this utility does is allow you to save the layout of your desktop icons, name that layout, and later restore that layout. So if for any reason your icons get scrambled, just launch DesktopOK, pick the appropriate layout, and restore them.

DesktopOK is a GUI-based utility with only one screen. When you launch it here's what you see: (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. DesktopOK's screen.

As you can see, it's a rather basic interface, but then what else would you want for it? I name my layouts according to the screen resolution I'm running, which is why my layout name is "3840x1080". I can see the time the layout was created and any informational comments I added when I saved the layout. To restore my icons to this layout, I make sure it's selected and click the "Restore" menu item. The icons are immediately restored to the positions defined in the layout.

Should you install an application that creates a new desktop icon (or otherwise rearrange the icons on your own), simply launch DesktopOK and click the "Save" menu item. When you save a layout, it's immediate, i.e., no prompting. After saving a second (or third or fourth) layout, each of the saves is listed in the DesktopOK screen. If you want to delete a previously saved layout, just right-click that layout and click "Delete" from the resulting Context menu.

Clicking the "ab|" tool allows you to rename the selected layout in a fashion not unlike renaming a file in Windows. The item to the right of the renaming tool allows you to sort your layouts. The menu across the top provides some ancillary functions that I really never use, but it may be worth your while to at least see what they are.

DesktopOK is a free download and can be retrieved from this site:

http://www.softwareok.com/?seite=Freeware/DesktopOK

 This tip (12922) applies to Windows 7, 8, and 10.

Author Bio

Barry Dysert

Barry has been a computer professional for over 30 years, working in different positions such as technical team leader, project manager, and software developer.  He is currently a senior software engineer with an emphasis on developing custom applications under Microsoft Windows. ...

MORE FROM BARRY

Understanding the Windows Experience Index

Sometimes it's good to know how powerful your system is. You may want to alleviate a hardware bottleneck or decide whether a ...

Discover More

Pin Items to File Explorer's Quick Access View

You can improve your efficiency at navigating the file system by using the Quick Access view. This tip shows you how to pin ...

Discover More

Introduction to PowerShell

PowerShell is found on all modern Windows computers. You might think of it as the next step up from the command line .bat ...

Discover More
More WindowsTips

AutoHotKeys

AutoHotKeys is a great multi-purpose utility that covers the spectrum from allowing you to define shortcut keys for ...

Discover More

Agent Ransack

If you need to search the contents of files fast, Agent Ransack is a tool worth having. It searches through multiple ...

Discover More

CutePDF Writer

CutePDF Writer is an extremely versatile utility that allows you to create PDF files from virtually any application that ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is seven more than 5?

2017-04-17 10:35:51

durbandon

I can't seem to download it. It comes with lots of other crapware. I am finding you less and less useful.


2017-04-17 09:54:41

Malcolm

For dealing with resizing problems this is undoubtedly the answer. But a more general solution to the problem of stopping icons from moving about is undoubtedly Fences (https://windows.tips.net/T005658_Locking_Icons_on_the_Desktop.html). I have used (and blessed) it from the moment Stardock brought it to market. It fences off designated areas of the desktop - individually designated by you, big, small, tall, wide - each with a bar for displaying a heading. My headings include: graphics, security, ebook stuff, website, program files, Office, current work ... 14 such categories in all. The beauty of it is that even if the area you fence off will only hold four icons, you can load it with as many more as you like; all of the hidden ones will be accessible via an up/down slider at the right-hand edge of the fence.
A little bonus feature is that a quick double-click on an empty area of your primary screen blanks it out to blue ... until another double-click brings it back.


Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.