Swapping Mouse Buttons for Left-Handed Users

by Barry Dysert
(last updated October 6, 2014)

Like it or not, we live in a world geared towards right-handed people. This means that the default mouse configuration is for right-handed people. Thus, a "normal" mouse click means clicking the left mouse button with your index finger, and it's explicitly called out if a right-click (typically done using your middle finger) is intended. Fortunately (for left-handed people), this is easy to change so that from your left hand you can perform a "normal" mouse click by using your index finger and when a right-click is called for, you can use your middle finger.

To swap the mouse buttons, start at the Control Panel and click Hardware and Sound. Under the "Devices and Printers" category click the Mouse link. Windows displays the Mouse Properties dialog box. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. The Mouse Properties dialog box.

Select the Switch Primary and Secondary Buttons check box. This immediately swaps the mouse buttons so that now you must right-click OK to dismiss the window. From this point on, your primary mouse button is the right one and the secondary button is the left one.

You can, of course, swap them back just as easily by again going to the Mouse Properties dialog box and right-clicking (since the right button is now your primary button) the Switch Primary and Secondary Buttons check box.

 This tip (12070) applies to Windows 7 and 8.

Author Bio

Barry Dysert

Barry has been a computer professional for over 30 years, working in different positions such as technical team leader, project manager, and software developer.  He is currently a senior software engineer with an emphasis on developing custom applications under Microsoft Windows. ...

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