Transferring Pictures from a Camera

by Barry Dysert
(last updated March 30, 2020)

If you have a digital camera, chances are that you'll want to transfer pictures from it to your computer. Depending upon the particular camera, this is usually a fairly straightforward task. Many cameras come with a transfer cable that has a USB plug on one end and a plug on the other end that fits into the camera.

With the camera turned off, plug the cable into your camera and into a USB slot in your computer. Then, turn the camera on. Windows will recognize the newly attached device and, depending on your AutoPlay settings, it may prompt you to see what action you want to take. If prompted, click the option that says, "Open Folder to View Files". If you aren't prompted, Windows will have automatically mapped a new drive letter to your camera.

Using Windows Explorer (Windows 7) or File Explorer (later versions of Windows), navigate to the newly mapped drive that represents your camera. Navigate to the folder of the camera that contains your pictures. Select the pictures that you want to copy to your computer and copy them as you would copy any other files from a computer-based folder.

When you're finished, turn off the camera and unplug the cable. Your pictures are now on your computer.

If you are using an older or non-standard camera that does not include a USB transfer cable, then transferring pictures from the camera typically requires special software of some manner. If you find yourself in this group of camera owners, you'll want to check the user's manual that came with the camera for transfer instructions.

 This tip (11723) applies to Windows 7, 8, and 10.

Author Bio

Barry Dysert

Barry has been a computer professional for over 35 years, working in different positions such as technical team leader, project manager, and software developer. He is currently a software engineer with an emphasis on developing custom applications under Microsoft Windows. When not working with Windows or writing Tips, Barry is an amateur writer. His first non-fiction book is titled "A Chronological Commentary of Revelation." ...

MORE FROM BARRY

Understanding Notifications in the Windows 10 Action Center

The Action Center is essentially the old Notification Area. This tip helps you understand it.

Discover More

Modifying Your Hosts File

Your Hosts file is an important file as far as network communications go, and you can easily edit it to suit your needs. ...

Discover More

PowerShell Input and Output

When dealing with a scripting language like PowerShell, one of the first things you need to learn is how to get data into ...

Discover More
More WindowsTips

Understanding the Videos Folder

The Videos folder is one of several system libraries created in Windows by default. This library is specifically ...

Discover More

Understanding ISO Images

ISO images are great for archival and portability. An ISO image is a file on your hard drive that represents an optical ...

Discover More

Understanding Windows Slide Show

If you have folders containing pictures, you may want to display them in a slide show. This tip explains how to do it.

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 9 + 8?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.