Removing Spyware with Windows Defender

by Barry Dysert
(last updated June 8, 2015)

Windows Defender, formerly known as Windows AntiSpyware, is a software program from Microsoft that provides continuous protection against malware. (The term malware is short for malicious software. It includes any number of harmful programs that can infiltrate your computer through your connection to the Internet.) In addition to providing real-time protection, Windows Defender also lets you perform on-demand scanning and malware removal.

If Windows Defender detects malware on your computer, information about whatever was detected is shown in the Windows Defender dialog box. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. Windows Defender displaying a malware warning.

At this point, you can click the Clean System button, or you can review what caused the alert by clicking the Review Detected Items link. If you click the Review Detected Items link you'll see the Windows Defender Alert dialog box, which contains a bit more detail about what Windows Defender discovered on your system. (See Figure 2.)

Figure 2. Windows Defender alert.

From here you can see even more details about the detected item. If you click the Show Details button, the dialog box expands to give you more information, including the name of the file that triggered the alert. When you?ve gathered enough information, you have the choice to clean the system or apply an action. There are three actions you can apply:

  • Remove. The file is permanently removed from your system. This is the same effect as if you had chosen Clean System from the Windows Defender dialog box.
  • Quarantine. The file is removed from its current location and stored in the quarantine database where you can deal with it later.
  • Allow. The file is no longer flagged as being malware and Windows Defender allows it to remain on your system.

You perform an action by selecting it from the Action drop-down list and then clicking the Apply Actions button.

������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

 This tip (12338) applies to Windows 7.

Author Bio

Barry Dysert

Barry has been a computer professional for over 30 years, working in different positions such as technical team leader, project manager, and software developer.  He is currently a senior software engineer with an emphasis on developing custom applications under Microsoft Windows. ...

MORE FROM BARRY

Getting Rid of Notification Area Icons

Getting notified of events can be useful, but if the notification icons get too numerous you may wish to turn some off. This ...

Discover More

Using the Character Map

There may be times when you need to insert special characters that aren't found on your keyboard. Windows provides a utility, ...

Discover More

Process Explorer

Process Explorer is a very well built utility that does a lot, from helping you with performance analysis to finding the ...

Discover More
More WindowsTips

Selecting Objects

Windows uses a graphical user interface that requires the manipulation of objects that appear on the screen. Understanding ...

Discover More

Creating a System Restore Point

System restore points are created automatically at strategic times in the operation of your computer. You can also manually ...

Discover More

Understanding Jump Lists

Jump lists are great productivity enhancers to Windows 7. By using jump lists, you can easily access frequently used ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is three minus 2?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.