Changing Font Size in a Command Prompt Window

by Barry Dysert
(last updated October 20, 2014)

1

There are many reasons why you might want to display the command prompt window. (How to display the command prompt window is covered in another tip.) Once you're at the command level, though, you may decide that you would prefer a different font size.

To change the font size in a command prompt window, right-click the window's title bar and select Properties from the drop-down menu. Windows displays the Command Prompt Properties dialog box; make sure the Font tab is displayed. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. The Font tab for the Command Prompt Properties dialog box.

The first thing you may notice on this tab is the Window Preview. This just shows where the command prompt window appears with respect to the entire desktop. In this case, the window appears in the upper left quadrant of the screen. (If you don't like this position it can be changed from the Layout tab.)

The current font size is adjacent to the Window Preview. In the above figure, it's telling me that the characters are 8x12, i.e., 8 pixels wide by 12 pixels high. This can be changed by selecting another row in the Size list. When you select another row you'll notice that the preview window changes immediately. (The "preview window" is the other black window in the lower left of the dialog box.)

The other setting you can change is the typeface. On the Font tab you can see that there are three choices for typeface: Consolas, Lucida Console, and Raster Fonts. Clicking on these also causes the preview window to change. Some typefaces allow for a bold style, and if the selected typeface supports it, the Bold Fonts checkbox will be enabled and you can select it.

When you're done making changes to your font, click OK and you will be returned to the command prompt window, with your new settings in effect. And these new settings are "remembered" so that even if you close the window, the next time you display another one it will use the fonts you previously selected.

 This tip (12072) applies to Windows 7 and 8.

Author Bio

Barry Dysert

Barry has been a computer professional for over 30 years, working in different positions such as technical team leader, project manager, and software developer.  He is currently a senior software engineer with an emphasis on developing custom applications under Microsoft Windows. ...

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What is three more than 8?

2014-10-20 17:35:41

GundegaKorsts

Truly a gift for those of us with limited vision.


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