Determining if You Have 32-bit or 64-bit Windows

by Barry Dysert
(last updated August 22, 2016)

2

Some Windows programs are designed for the 32-bit version, some for the 64-bit version, and many programs can run in either environment. Whatever the case, you may want to know whether you're running the 32-bit or the 64-bit version of Windows. (This tidbit of information is particularly important if you want to upgrade some of the device drives on your system—you need to use either 32-bit or 64-bit drivers that match your 32-bit or 64-bit version of Windows.)

How you check to see whether you are running 32-bit or 64-bit Windows depends on the version of Windows you are using:

  • If you are using Windows 7, click the Start button, right-click Computer, and select Properties.
  • If you are using Windows 8 or Windows 10, display the Control Panel (a good way is to press Win+X to display a Context menu at the bottom-left of the screen, then choose Control Panel), click System and Security, and finally click System.

Regardless of whether you are using Windows 7 or 8, you'll see information about your system. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. Seeing whether you're running 32-bit or 64-bit Windows.

Look near the middle of the dialog box and you should see information labeled "System Type." This is where you can see whether you are running the 32-bit or 64-bit version of the Windows operating system.

 This tip (11883) applies to Windows 7, 8, and 10.

Author Bio

Barry Dysert

Barry has been a computer professional for over 35 years, working in different positions such as technical team leader, project manager, and software developer. He is currently a software engineer with an emphasis on developing custom applications under Microsoft Windows. When not working with Windows or writing Tips, Barry is an amateur writer. His first non-fiction book is titled "A Chronological Commentary of Revelation." ...

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What is six minus 3?

2016-08-22 19:59:22

bob phillips

Thanks. The WIN+X is new to me. Just like win 10 is new to me.


2016-08-22 06:24:08

Jan Heijkamp

Look on C:.
If you see a program files(x86) folder you have a 64 Bits OS


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