Hiding Fonts

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated June 30, 2014)

5

Most people know that you can add and remove fonts from Windows. When a font is added, it is available to all the programs running on the system. When the font is later removed, it is no longer available and your software may substitute a similar font for the missing one.

However, you might not want to delete a font; you may want to just make it unavailable for the time being. In Windows this is called "hiding" the font. You can hide a font by using the Fonts area of the Control Panel; follow these steps to display it in Windows 7:

  1. Click the Start button and then click Control Panel. Windows, as you might assume, displays the Control Panel.
  2. Click the Appearance and Personalization link.
  3. Click Fonts. Windows displays the Font area of the Control Panel. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Fonts area of the Control Panel in Windows 7.

If you are using Windows 8, you can display the same area of the Control Panel by following these steps:

  1. Press Win+C. Windows displays the Charms bar at the right side of the screen.
  2. Click Settings to display the Settings panel at the right side of the screen.
  3. Click the Control Panel option. Windows displays the Control Panel.
  4. Click the Appearance and Personalization link.
  5. Click Fonts. Windows displays the Font area of the Control Panel. (See Figure 2.)
  6. Figure 2. The Fonts area of the Control Panel in Windows 8.

To hide a font, just select the font you want to hide (click its file name in the window). Windows displays some options to the right of the Organize option, just above the fonts. One of those options is Hide; click it and the font is immediately hidden. Once hidden, the font won't show up as available in any Windows programs.

If you later want to unhide the font, simply follow the same steps, as already described. When you select the font you want to unhide, the options displayed above the fonts will include a "Show" option. Select it, and the font is immediately unhidden and available within Windows.

 This tip (13152) applies to Windows 7 and 8.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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What is three minus 2?

2016-02-29 08:57:06

Larry Daniels

Anyway I find this doesn't work. I hid all but one of my fonts and rebooted my computer, but they all appeared again.


2016-02-29 08:56:02

Larry Daniels

You might want to hide fonts if you don't want to use them now, but retain the option to use them in the future. If you delete them, you can't use them at all (unless you reload them, which is a hassle). You might want to hide fonts if you use a particular font as your default and don't need to have all those other fonts getting in the way. It can be a huge, huge list to scroll down each time you want to get to the font you use.


2014-06-30 16:49:39

Jack

I agree with John & Scott.
What's the purpose / advantage to hide fonts???


2014-06-30 14:46:31

John Hawklyn

Does 'hiding' the font prevent windows from loading it into memory at startup?

If so I can see one value to this - freeing up more computer memory.

If not, why bother?


2014-06-30 10:31:56

Scott Renz

Why would you hide a font?


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