Turning on Night Light

by Eric Wyatt
(last updated February 26, 2018)


It has been known for some time now that the glow from the various devices we use can affect our sleep, or circadian rhythm. In a world increasingly populated with various devices that we look at day-in-day-out this can result in a lack of sleep. I don't know about you, but I enjoy my sleep. In Windows 10 you can go in and turn on a setting that helps minimize the effects of monitor glow by changing the color temperature of your monitor automatically.

Typically, your monitor emits a blue tone, this mimics the lighting we are used to seeing during the daytime. By shifting your monitor to a warmer color rather than the "bluer" color that it is typically set to, you help yourself fall asleep when you finally drag yourself away from the computer at the end of a late-night work session.

To configure your computer for Night Light, follow these steps:

  1. Click on the Start button in the bottom left corner. This will open the start screen.
  2. Click on the Settings icon (it looks like a small gear). You should now see the Settings dialog box open.
  3. Click on System. This will present you with the System section of the Settings dialog box.
  4. Click on Display. This will open the settings for the Display
  5. Click on the toggle under the Night Light (Off Until 6:00PM) option. Note that the time shown on the option may vary on your computer. (See Figure 1.)
  6. Figure 1. Turn on Night light (off until 6:00PM).

  7. Close the Settings dialog box.

Night light will now turn on automatically at the time that is displayed above the toggle.

 This tip (5922) applies to Windows 10.

Author Bio

Eric Wyatt

Eric Wyatt is a swell guy (or so his friends tell him). He is a formally trained designer and branding expert, bringing a wide range of skills to his Tips.Net articles. ...


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What is five less than 8?

2018-02-27 17:33:49


Not so fast my friends...

On my system, Win 10 Pro Up-to-date (release 1709), the night light settings are disabled. After slowly going craze trying to figure out what was causing this, I sought assistance using MS remote access support. Upon extended examination of a number of system files and completion of two lengthy sessions which included several registry changes and concluding with a full update/reinstall of release 1709, I was told the problem was being caused a block of corrupted system values. Problem still exists...not clear it's worth trying again. I'm reasonably proficient in these areas myself, and I have to believe that MS Tier 2 support should certainly be able to fix the problem. Anyone have any ideas, please advise. Thanks.

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