Changing Your Sound Theme

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated February 23, 2015)

Most PCs these days come with some sort of audio system attached. It may be nothing more than a small speaker inside the computer case, or it may be a full-blown system with external speakers and subwoofers.

Knowing this, Microsoft has built audio support into Windows for quite some time. In fact, Windows itself uses sound to signal certain system-level events. In other WindowsTips you discover how to change the sounds associated with those events.

What you may not know is that Windows has what Microsoft terms sound themes. A sound theme is a collection of sounds associated with a specific Windows theme. In other words, when you change your Windows theme (which controls backgrounds, colors, pointers, etc. used by Windows), a different sound theme is also called into play.

It's not unusual to like a particular Windows theme, visually, but not be happy with the sound theme associated with it. Fortunately, Windows allows you to change the sound theme independent of which overall Windows theme you've selected. Here's how to do it:

  1. Display the Control Panel.
  2. Click the Change System Sounds link under the Sound heading. Windows displays the Sounds tab of the Sound dialog box. (See Figure 1.)
  3. Figure 1. The Sounds tab of the Sound dialog box.

  4. Use the Sound Scheme drop-down list to choose the theme you want to use.
  5. Click on OK to close the dialog box.

Simple, right? If you want, you can change individual sounds using the controls in the Program Events list. When your sounds are just the way you want, you can then click the Save As button (to the right of the Sound Scheme drop-down list) to save your own sound theme. That way you can call it up at any time should Windows change the sound theme when you choose a different Windows theme.

 This tip (399) applies to Windows 7 and 8.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

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