Changing User Permissions for an Entire Drive

by Barry Dysert
(last updated March 7, 2016)

In Windows, every disk drive has an associated security profile which determines who is allowed access to the drive and what kind of access (e.g., read or write) a user is entitled to. If you are an administrator or have Control access to the drive, you can change the drive's permissions, thereby allowing or denying certain types of access.

To see a drive's permissions, display an Explorer window that shows the drives on your system in the navigation pane. Right-click on the drive whose permissions you want to change and choose Properties. In the resulting dialog box make sure the Security tab is displayed. (See Figure 1.)

Figure 1. Permissions associated with drive E:.

This particular screen shot shows that user "Jim Olin" has three permissions for the drive: Read & Execute, List Folder Contents, and Read. To deny that user access, click the Edit button and again select user Jim Olin. Windows presents a dialog box that allows you to specify permissions for the user. (See Figure 2.)

Figure 2. Editing permissions of drive E: for user Jim Olin.

Now click the Deny checkboxes that are beside the three checked boxes and OK out of the Properties dialog boxes. Now, when user Jim Olin attempts to access the "E:" drive he gets an error message and is prevented from accessing the drive.

 This tip (5837) applies to Windows 7, 8, and 10.

Author Bio

Barry Dysert

Barry has been a computer professional for over 35 years, working in different positions such as technical team leader, project manager, and software developer. He is currently a software engineer with an emphasis on developing custom applications under Microsoft Windows. When not working with Windows or writing Tips, Barry is an amateur writer. His first non-fiction book is titled "A Chronological Commentary of Revelation." ...

MORE FROM BARRY

How to Password Protect a File or Folder via Zip

If you routinely create ZIP files, you may want to add some protection to those files. This tip shows how easy it is to ...

Discover More

What are the Limits on File Names?

It's good to know what the limits are when naming files, although in most cases the limits are sufficiently high that ...

Discover More

Ending a Frozen Program

Sometimes a program can get 'stuck,' meaning it is no longer responsive and appears to be doing nothing at all. You can ...

Discover More
More WindowsTips

Easily Running a Program as the Administrator

In order to run some programs properly in the Windows environment, you'll need to do so using administrator privileges. ...

Discover More

Understanding Action Center

Action Center provides you with a quick overview of security and maintenance issues and allows you to drill down to the ...

Discover More

Recovering a Forgotten Administrator Password

Forgetting your administrator password may be cause for panic because there is no supported way to discover it. Before ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments

If you would like to add an image to your comment (not an avatar, but an image to help in making the point of your comment), include the characters [{fig}] in your comment text. You’ll be prompted to upload your image when you submit the comment. Maximum image size is 6Mpixels. Images larger than 600px wide or 1000px tall will be reduced. Up to three images may be included in a comment. All images are subject to review. Commenting privileges may be curtailed if inappropriate images are posted.

What is 8 + 3?

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)


Newest Tips
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.