Adjusting the Cursor Blink Rate

by Allen Wyatt
(last updated December 28, 2015)

Have you noticed how, sometimes, Microsoft uses different words to describe the exact same thing? For instance, if you are a Microsoft Word fan, you have undoubtedly seen reference to the "insertion point." This is the blinking cursor, on screen, that indicates where whatever you type will start to appear. In other programs this "insertion point" is simply referred to as a "cursor." In fact, that's what Windows refers to it as—the cursor.

In fact, Windows gives you a bit of control over that cursor. Specifically, you can adjust how quickly the cursor blinks on the screen. The way you do that is to follow these steps:

  1. Display the Control Panel.
  2. In the search box (upper-right corner of the Control Panel window) type "keyboard" (without the quotes). Windows displays several matching options.
  3. Click the Keyboard link. Windows displays the Keyboard Properties dialog box with the Speed tab selected. (See Figure 1.)
  4. Figure 1. The Keyboard Properties dialog box.

  5. Use the Cursor Blink Rate slider to adjust how quickly the cursor blinks.
  6. Click on OK to close the Keyboard Properties dialog box.
  7. Close the Control Panel.

Any change you make to the cursor blink rate takes effect immediately.

 This tip (10044) applies to Windows 7, 8, and 10.

Author Bio

Allen Wyatt

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He  is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. ...

MORE FROM ALLEN

Putting Character Codes to Work

If you know the character codes for some characters of interest, you can use those codes to do lots of tasks. This tip ...

Discover More

Calculating Time Differences between Two Machines

Want to know how much of a time difference there is between your machine and a different machine? This tip provides some ...

Discover More

Opening a Recently Used Workbook

Excel provides a special tool that can help you locate and open workbooks you've worked with recently. Here's how to use the ...

Discover More
MORE WINDOWSTIPS

Using Two Monitors with Windows

Windows is great about letting you work on multiple things at the same time. Often, however, you end up with so many windows ...

Discover More

Finding a Device Driver's Version

Device drivers are used to allow a hardware device to communicate effectively with Windows. You might need to know a device ...

Discover More

Checking for Faulty RAM

Although it's rare for RAM to go bad, it does happen. This tip tells you how to check for faulty RAM by using the Windows ...

Discover More
Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

View most recent newsletter.

Comments for this tip:

There are currently no comments for this tip. (Be the first to leave your comment—just use the simple form above!)

Subscribe

FREE SERVICE: Get tips like this every week in WindowsTips, a free productivity newsletter. Enter your address and click "Subscribe."

(Your e-mail address is not shared with anyone, ever.)

View the most recent newsletter.

Links and Sharing
Share